Apical invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by salmonella typhimurium requires villin to remodel the brush border actin cytoskeleton

Nouara Lhocine, Ellen T. Arena, Perrine Bomme, Florent Ubelmann, Marie Christine Prévost, Sylvie Robine, Philippe J. Sansonetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Citations (Scopus)
21 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Salmonella invasion of intestinal epithelial cells requires extensive, though transient, actin modifications at the site of bacterial entry. The actin-modifying protein villin is present in the brush border where it participates in the constitution of microvilli and in epithelial restitution after damage through its actin-severing activity. We investigated a possible role for villin in Salmonella invasion. The absence of villin, which is normally located at the bacterial entry site, leads to a decrease in Salmonella invasion. Villin is necessary for early membrane-associated processes and for optimal ruffle assembly by balancing the steady-state level of actin. The severing activity of villin is important for Salmonella invasion in vivo. The bacterial phosphatase SptP tightly regulates villin phosphorylation, while the actin-binding effector SipA protects F-actin and counterbalances villin-severing activity. Thus, villin plays an important role in establishing the balance between actin polymerization and actin severing to facilitate the initial steps of Salmonella entry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)164-177
Number of pages14
JournalCell Host and Microbe
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2015

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