An anthocyanin-rich extract obtained from portuguese blueberries maintains its efficacy in reducing microglia-driven neuroinflammation after simulated digestion

Diana Serra, Joana F. Henriques, Teresa Serra, Andreia Bento Silva, Maria Rosário Bronze, Teresa C.P. Dinis, Leonor Martins Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Dietary polyphenols are multi-target compounds that have been considered promising candidates in strategies for the mitigation of neurological diseases, acting particularly through reduction of microglia-driven neuroinflammation. In this study, an anthocyanin-rich extract obtained from Portuguese blueberries was subjected to a simulated gastrointestinal digestion; after chemical characterisation, the potential of both non-digested and digested extracts to combat neuroinflammation was evaluated using a microglia N9 cell line. Although the extracts have markedly different chemical composition, both were efficient in reducing the production of either key inflammatory markers or reactive oxygen species and in enhancing reduced glutathione levels in activated cells. Furthermore, this protection was shown to be related to the suppression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) activation, and to a signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-independent mechanism. These results demonstrate that the anthocyanin extract, after simulated digestion, maintains its efficacy against neuroinflammation, and can, therefore, assume a relevant role in prevention of neuroinflammation-related neurological disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3670
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Anthocyanins
  • In vitro digestion
  • Microglia
  • Neuroinflammation
  • NF-kB
  • Phenolic acids
  • ROS
  • STAT1

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An anthocyanin-rich extract obtained from portuguese blueberries maintains its efficacy in reducing microglia-driven neuroinflammation after simulated digestion'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this