Advancing purchasing as a design science: Publication guidelines to shift towards more relevant purchasing research

Raphael Stange, Holger Schiele, Jörg Henseler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Due to rapidly changing business environments, purchasing and supply management (PSM) organisations are constantly confronted with new problems impacting organisational performance. PSM research can address these problems through design science research. Design science is also regarded as the science of the artificial. Design science research is a methodology that aims to systematically generate knowledge for the design, synthesis, testing, and evaluation of human-made artefacts (e.g., tools, interventions, policies) that solve practical problems. PSM artefacts such as the purchasing portfolio matrix invented by Kraljic (1983) represent a valuable opportunity to solve problems in the PSM discipline. However, our artificial-intelligence (AI)-based analysis of the discipline's flagship journal, the Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management (JPSM), indicates that design-oriented publications in PSM are underrepresented, accounting for less than 4% of the total publications. We argue that existing PSM research should be complemented with more design-oriented research, and address the following research question: How can PSM scholars publish more design-oriented research? Our objectives are to (1) provide arguments for advancing PSM as a design science, (2) nurture a better understanding of design science research as a methodology, and (3) propose publication guidelines that enable researchers to present design-oriented research in a management journal.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100750
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Purchasing and Supply Management
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Purchasing
  • Procurement
  • Design science
  • Publication guidelines

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