A scalable insect cell-based production process of the human recombinant BMX for in-vitro covalent ligand high-throughput screening

Bárbara B. Sousa, Marcos F.Q. Sousa, Marta C. Marques, João D. Seixas, José A. Brito, Pedro M. Matias, Gonçalo J. L. Bernardes, António Roldão

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bone Marrow Tyrosine kinase in the chromosome X (BMX) is a TEC family kinase associated with numerous pathological pathways in cancer cells. Covalent inhibition of BMX activity holds promise as a therapeutic approach against cancer. To screen for potent and selective covalent BMX inhibitors, large quantities of highly pure BMX are normally required which is challenging with the currently available production and purification processes. Here, we developed a scalable production process for the human recombinant BMX (hrBMX) using the insect cell-baculovirus expression vector system. Comparable expression levels were obtained in small-scale shake flasks (13 mL) and in stirred-tank bioreactors (STB, 5 L). A two-step chromatographic-based process was implemented, reducing purification times by 75% when compared to traditional processes, while maintaining hrBMX stability. The final production yield was 24 mg of purified hrBMX per litter of cell culture, with a purity of > 99%. Product quality was assessed and confirmed through a series of biochemical and biophysical assays, including circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering. Overall, the platform herein developed was capable of generating 100 mg purified hrBMX from 5 L STB in just 34 days, thus having the potential to assist in-vitro covalent ligand high-throughput screening for BMX activity inhibition.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBioprocess and Biosystems Engineering
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Bioprocess development
  • Cancer therapy
  • hrBMX crystallization
  • hrBMX production
  • IC-BEVS

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