A method to detect keystrokes using accelerometry to quantify typing rate and monitor neurodegenerative progression

Ana Londral, Mafalda Camara, Hugo Filipe Silveira Gamboa, Mamede De Carvalho, Anabela Pinto, Luás Azevedo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Progressive motor neurodegenerative diseases, as ALS, cause progressive loss of motor function in upper limbs. Motor involvement, also affecting speech at some stage of disease, cause increasing difficulties in accessing to computer devices (and internet tools) that allow communication with caregivers, and healthy professionals. Thus, monitoring progression is important to anticipate new assistive technologies (AT), e.g. computer interface. We present a novel methodology to monitor upper limb typing task functional effectiveness. In our approach, an accelerometer is placed on the index finger allows to measure the number of keystrokes per minute. We developed algorithm that was accurate when tested in three ALS patients and in three control subjects. This method to evaluate communication performance explores the quantification of movement as an early predictor of progression.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNEUROTECHNIX 2013 - Proceedings of the International Congress on Neurotechnology, Electronics and Informatics
Pages54-59
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event1st International Congress on Neurotechnology, Electronics and Informatics, NEUROTECHNIX 2013 - Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal
Duration: 18 Sep 201320 Sep 2013

Conference

Conference1st International Congress on Neurotechnology, Electronics and Informatics, NEUROTECHNIX 2013
CountryPortugal
CityVilamoura, Algarve
Period18/09/1320/09/13

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Assistive technologies
  • Motor performance
  • Progressive neurological conditions

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